ANGIOFIBROMA NASOFARING BELIA PDF

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Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a pathologically benign yet locally aggressive and destructive vascular lesion of head and neck. The juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a highly Nasoangiofibroma youth is a highly vascularized tumor almost exclusively male. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNA) are a rare benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor. Epidemiology Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

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Management of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: A Five Year Retrospective Study

Diagnostic and therapeutic management. Check for errors and try again. Retrieved from ” https: Summary of preoperative pre-op. These features along with the specific age and sex predilection can help in differentiating JNA from other nasopharyngeal lesions. The histologic origin of JNA angifibroma vascular endothelial cells or fibroblasts.

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

Site of extension Case no. At the time of diagnosis, the mass classically involves the pterygopalatine fossa. Markers of vascular differentiation, proliferation and tissue remodeling in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. You can also scroll through stacks with your mouse wheel or the keyboard arrow keys.

However, since a vast majority of the cases do occur between 14 and 25 years of age, this term is retained.

Management of Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: A Five Year Retrospective Study

Summary of signs and symptoms observed in the study. Ear Nose Throat J. Biological distinctions between juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and vascular malformation: The study discusses about most common presenting complaints, correlation of preoperative radiological and intraoperative staging and factors affecting recurrence of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

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Vascular fibroma of the nasopharynx naso-pharyngeal fibroma Arch Otolaryngol. Case 3 Case 3. The advantages felt with endoscopic approach were better and magnified view of various extents and attachments of JNA and the surgical dissection can well be limited to subperiosteal plane. Angiofibromas originating outside the nasopharynx may appear as an intraoral mass in the retromolar or buccal space area. A case report of JNA with rare intra-oral manifestation in a year-old male patient is presented in the article.

Adolescents and young adults between 14 and 25 years are affected, and there is a distinct male predominance. Biopsy should be avoided as to avoid extensive bleeding since the tumor is composed of blood vessels without a muscular coat. Continuous growth involves the sphenoidal sinus, nasal fossa and middle turbinate, pterygomaxillary fossa and the posterior wall of the maxillary sinus as seen in the present case.

The muscular lining of the blood vessel is absent in small and incomplete in larger vessels. This approach with partial medial maxillectomy can give good exposure of pterygopalatine fossa and easy manipulation of maxillary artery.

Extraoral examination revealed normal appearing overlying skin.

Blood vessels were seen in large number at the periphery of the lesion [ Figure 5 ]. Extensive bony destruction is usually not a feature, but rather bone is remodelled or resorbed. The smaller vessels in the central portion of the lesion typically lack muscular elastic angiofibeoma and the absence of muscular coat contributes to the capacity for massive bleeding that occurs with JNA [ 3 ]. CT images show a heterodense mass that is centered in the sphenopalatine foramen.

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Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a pathologically benign yet locally aggressive and destructive vascular lesion of head and neck region typically affecting adolescent boys. Abstract Brlia nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males.

The patients were treated surgically using various surgical approaches like trans-palatal, endoscopic trans-nasal, lateral rhinotomy and trans-maxillary approach depending on their JNA stage. Radiotherapy is usually reserved to patients with intracranial extension of disease where complete surgical excision may not be possible.

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma JNA is a rare benign tumor arising predominantly in the nasopharynx of adolescent males. Case 2 Case 2.

JNA is classified as Type I when the tumor is restricted to the nasal cavity and the nasopharynx without bone destruction, Type II when the tumor invades the pterygomaxillary fossa and maxillary, sphenoidal and ethmoid sinuses with bone bleia, Type III when the tumor invades the infratemporal fossa, the orbit, and the parasellar region but remains lateral to the cavernous sinus ansofaring Type IV when the tumor invades the cavernous sinus, the optic chiasma and the pituitary fossa.

Mesothelioma Malignant solitary fibrous tumor. Pterygopalatine fossa was invaded in 3 patients. Intraoral view showing swelling on the upper left side of the maxilla and obliteration of the vestibule. Open in a separate window.